delware environmental institute

IN THE NEWS

Environmental news from Delaware and the surrounding region.

12/11/2017 -

Phil Barnes looked around the Trabant Center Theater during a break and saw exactly what he hoped to see at the University of Delaware's two-day Smart Cities and Sustainable Energy symposium. "I see two Newark City Council members talking to faculty members, we just listened to a state transportation director and now I see him shaking hands with an urban planner," he said.

12/11/2017 -

The earthquake that shook Dover, Delaware, on Nov. 30 began five miles below the earth’s surface and registered 4.1 on the Richter scale, a numerical scale that quantifies the intensity or magnitude of the event. Delaware State Geologist David Wunsch said Thursday’s earthquake was the first to be felt in Delaware since August 2011, when a magnitude 5.8 earthquake struck central Virginia and subsequently reverberated through the First State.

12/08/2017 -

When conducting research in remote areas to get population estimates on elusive animals, it’s important to make sure that the camera traps which will capture images of those animals are set up properly. Once the camera traps are placed, they can’t be adjusted and the only time they’ll be looked at again is when they’re picked up at the end of the study. Thanks to the Brandywine Zoo, University of Delaware researcher Jennifer McCarthy was able to test various camera heights, distances, settings and bait and scent stations to see how to best set up her cameras for an upcoming research project looking at the elusive jaguarundi cat in Panama’s Mamoni Valley.

12/08/2017 -

Societal concerns about climate change, severe weather and rising seas are raising questions about readiness across the globe. Extreme weather events this year such as Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria underscore the need to be prepared. Planning for sea level rise is especially important for the U.S. Mid-Atlantic coastal region, including Delaware, due to its high concentration of population and development, critical natural ecosystems, and public infrastructure located near the coast. This region is known as a sea level rise hotspot, where rates of sea level rise are roughly twice the global average because of processes such as weakening of the Gulf Stream and land subsidence.

12/05/2017 -

Next time you buy a car, what will you look for?  Most people want a model with automated features or better fuel economy than their current car, according to surveys from the American Automobile Association (AAA) and Consumer’s Union. In two new labs at the University of Delaware, these vehicles of the future are being put to the test. 

12/04/2017 -

Yushan Yan has received the Electrochemical Society (ECS) Energy Technology Division Research Award for 2018. Yan is a Distinguished Engineering Professor and Associate Dean for Research and Entrepreneurship in the University of Delaware’s College of Engineering. The Electrochemical Society advances electrochemical and solid state science and technology. Its Energy Technology Division focuses on energy conversion through technologies such as fuel cells, electrolyzers, flow batteries, and more. The ECS Energy Technology Division Research Award recognizes researchers whose achievements will likely impact future research and development in the field.

12/04/2017 -

A new theory by researchers at the University of Delaware-led Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) will help bring greater accuracy and focus to molecular science research, with the potential for far-reaching impact across multiple industries. The findings— reported by UD graduate student researchers Joshua Lansford and Alexander Mironenko with support from CCEI director Dionisios Vlachos—establish predictive capability for the behavior of molecules called adsorbates. Adsorption is a process by which molecules of gas, liquid or dissolved solids adhere to a surface, including metals such as iron, copper, nickel and titanium.

12/04/2017 -

More than 250 stakeholders from Delaware agencies, academic institutions, non-profits and, critically, 22 local Delaware communities turned out Nov. 27 for the inaugural Delaware Resilient and Sustainable Communities Summit. The event was sponsored by Delaware Sea Grant (DESG), the University of Delaware, the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) and the Department of Transportation to highlight changing climate and weather conditions with a focus on improving community preparedness and response.

11/21/2017 -

University of Delaware professor Patrick Gaffney and alumnus Keith Bayha, a research associate with the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, have determined that a common sea nettle jellyfish is actually two distinct species. The Atlantic sea nettle is one of the most common and well known jellyfish along the U.S. East Coast, especially in the Chesapeake Bay and Rehoboth Bay where they commonly sting swimmers in large numbers. Since it was described nearly 175 years ago, the jellyfish has been assumed to be a single species.

11/21/2017 -

The Society for Literature, Science and the Arts (SLSA) has awarded its 2017 Michelle Kendrick Memorial Book Prize to Julian Yates, professor of English at the University of Delaware, for Of Sheep, Oranges, and Yeast: A Multispecies Impression. The Kendrick Prize is awarded annually for the best academic book on literature, science and the arts published during the last year. It was established in 2006 in memory of literature and science scholar Michelle Kendrick of Washington State University-Vancouver.