delware environmental institute

IN THE NEWS

Environmental news from Delaware and the surrounding region.

12/05/2017 -

Next time you buy a car, what will you look for?  Most people want a model with automated features or better fuel economy than their current car, according to surveys from the American Automobile Association (AAA) and Consumer’s Union. In two new labs at the University of Delaware, these vehicles of the future are being put to the test. 

12/04/2017 -

Yushan Yan has received the Electrochemical Society (ECS) Energy Technology Division Research Award for 2018. Yan is a Distinguished Engineering Professor and Associate Dean for Research and Entrepreneurship in the University of Delaware’s College of Engineering. The Electrochemical Society advances electrochemical and solid state science and technology. Its Energy Technology Division focuses on energy conversion through technologies such as fuel cells, electrolyzers, flow batteries, and more. The ECS Energy Technology Division Research Award recognizes researchers whose achievements will likely impact future research and development in the field.

12/04/2017 -

A new theory by researchers at the University of Delaware-led Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) will help bring greater accuracy and focus to molecular science research, with the potential for far-reaching impact across multiple industries. The findings— reported by UD graduate student researchers Joshua Lansford and Alexander Mironenko with support from CCEI director Dionisios Vlachos—establish predictive capability for the behavior of molecules called adsorbates. Adsorption is a process by which molecules of gas, liquid or dissolved solids adhere to a surface, including metals such as iron, copper, nickel and titanium.

12/04/2017 -

More than 250 stakeholders from Delaware agencies, academic institutions, non-profits and, critically, 22 local Delaware communities turned out Nov. 27 for the inaugural Delaware Resilient and Sustainable Communities Summit. The event was sponsored by Delaware Sea Grant (DESG), the University of Delaware, the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) and the Department of Transportation to highlight changing climate and weather conditions with a focus on improving community preparedness and response.

11/21/2017 -

University of Delaware professor Patrick Gaffney and alumnus Keith Bayha, a research associate with the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, have determined that a common sea nettle jellyfish is actually two distinct species. The Atlantic sea nettle is one of the most common and well known jellyfish along the U.S. East Coast, especially in the Chesapeake Bay and Rehoboth Bay where they commonly sting swimmers in large numbers. Since it was described nearly 175 years ago, the jellyfish has been assumed to be a single species.

11/21/2017 -

The Society for Literature, Science and the Arts (SLSA) has awarded its 2017 Michelle Kendrick Memorial Book Prize to Julian Yates, professor of English at the University of Delaware, for Of Sheep, Oranges, and Yeast: A Multispecies Impression. The Kendrick Prize is awarded annually for the best academic book on literature, science and the arts published during the last year. It was established in 2006 in memory of literature and science scholar Michelle Kendrick of Washington State University-Vancouver.

11/05/2017 -

Airplanes zoom overhead, wispy-white contrails streaming behind them. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) handled 43,684 flights, on average, every day last year, and U.S. military and commercial flights together used over 20 billion gallons of jet fuel. All those emissions add up. World air travel contributed 815 million tons of CO2 emissions in 2016 — two percent of the global manmade total, according to the International Air Transport Association. And global air traffic is not slowing down. IATA predicts that 7.2 billion passengers will travel by air in 2035, nearly doubling the 3.8 billion that flew in 2016.

11/05/2017 -

Alternative fuels will power our future—and that future is coming fast. Earlier this month, General Motors announced that it plans to launch at least 20 all-electric vehicles by 2023. At the University of Delaware, the Center for Fuel Cells and Batteries, formerly known as the Center for Fuel Cell Research, is a hub for innovation in sustainable fuel.

11/05/2017 -

The fourth annual Water Symposium was held on Friday, Sept. 29, at the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) campus in Townsend Hall. The annual event provides an excellent opportunity for faculty and students affiliated with the interdisciplinary Water Science and Policy (WSP) Graduate Program to present their research, share ideas with peers, and network with professionals from industry, government, and nonprofit organizations. Around 70 people attended the symposium and represented a mix of academia, industry, and government agencies.

11/05/2017 -

University of Delaware doctoral student Desiree Narango is researching trees and shrubs planted in the lawns of homeowners throughout the Washington, D.C., Maryland and northern Virginia areas to assess how those choices are impacting food webs. Narango, who is working with Doug Tallamy, professor of entomology in UD’s Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology, is also associated with the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center and works through a citizen-science program called “Neighborhood Nest Watch.” Narango is co-advised by Pete Marra, director of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center.