delware environmental institute

IN THE NEWS

Environmental news from Delaware and the surrounding region.

Novel study shows ‘cocktail’ of soil bacteria can protect rice plants from deadly forces
11/18/2016 -

University of Delaware student Jonathon Cottone knows the tell-tale signs that rice plants are getting sick: the yellowing leaves, the faint football-shaped lesions.

Cottone, a junior from Wilmington, Delaware, is working with Harsh Bais, associate professor of plant and soil sciences at UD, on research to help this globally important grain cope with increasing stress.

Recently, the UD team found that when rice plants are subjected to multiple threats — including increasing concentrations of poisonous arsenic in water and soil, an urgent concern in Southeast Asia, plus a fungal disease called rice blast — the plants aren’t necessarily goners.

11/09/2016 -

Students who are interested in making sound environmental policy have an opportunity to gain direct experience this winter and spring through a paid internship with the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC).

11/09/2016 -

If you’ve ever been to the beach, it’s likely that you have observed the foamy whitecaps that form as waves break along the shore or out at sea. For many, it’s a photo-worthy moment, but what most people don’t know is that the droplets contained in these whitecaps also serve an important role in our global weather and climate. Scientists call these droplets ocean spray.

11/07/2016 -

A new study published today in Scientific Reports by University of Delaware researchers and colleagues reveals that 100 feet below the surface of the ocean is a critical depth for ecological activity in the Arctic polar night — a period of near continuous winter darkness. It is at this depth, the researchers said, that atmospheric light diminishes in the water column and bioluminescence from marine organisms becomes the dominant light source. It also is the site of significant changes in the composition of luminescent organisms present in the water column.

11/03/2016 -

Lake Matano is located on a remote, difficult-to-reach island in Indonesia, but its waters offer up answers to a broad range of scientific questions ranging from pollution and predation to endemic species and evolution. For the University of Delaware’s Julie Maresca, the long journey to the lake, and the primitive research conditions she encountered there, proved worth the effort when she and her team made an important discovery about methane release in freshwater systems.

11/03/2016 -

Bio-fuels and bio-based chemicals have gained tremendous traction over the past decade as a means to produce alternatives to fossil fuels and to replace bulk chemical production methods that rely on petrochemicals.

11/03/2016 -

University of Delaware doctoral student Stephanie Dohner has been selected as a Mid-Atlantic Coastal Storms Program graduate research fellow by Virginia Sea Grant. Dohner, of Englewood, Ohio, is studying oceanography in UD’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment. She was one of six finalists selected in the Mid-Atlantic region in a competitive application process.

UD study suggests people prefer conservation as way to protect drinking water
10/29/2016 -

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan put the need to protect and invest in clean drinking water front and center in the minds of many Americans. But how to go about investing, as well as how to get the public on board with such spending, is a difficult challenge that faces policymakers.

A new study from the University of Delaware has found that when given the choice, people prefer to invest their money in conservation, such as protecting key areas of a watershed — also referred to as green infrastructure — rather than in traditional water treatment plants — also referred to as gray infrastructure.

Stanford’s Mark Z. Jacobson to address global warming and energy
10/20/2016 -

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Delaware will hold the second lecture in its 2016-17 Distinguished Lecture Series on Wednesday, Nov. 16, from 3:30-4:30 p.m. in the Mitchell Hall Auditorium.

<>Mark Jacobson, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University, will deliver a talk, “Is this the Only Hope for Reversing Global Warming? Transitioning Each Country’s All-Purpose Energy to Electricity Powered 100 Percent by Wind, Water, and Sunlight.”

 

Leading climate scientist to discuss Greenland’s contribution to global sea level
10/12/2016 -

Noted climate scientist Laurence C. Smith will discuss Greenland’s contribution to global sea levels at the John R. Mather Visiting Scholars Lecture at 6 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 3.

The lecture will be held in the Gore Recital Hall in the Roselle Center for the Arts on the University of Delaware campus in Newark, and kicks off a yearlong celebration of geography’s 50th anniversary as a department.

The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required